Thursday, December 31, 2020

Centum Verba 7: Vulpes et Mulieres

You can find more Latin stories at Centum.LauraGibbs.net,
and more Tiny Tales at 100Words.LauraGibbs.net.


Vulpes ambulat. 
Esuriens est vulpes, 
et de cibo cogitat.
Iuxta villam transit. 
Mulierum villanarum catervam videt. 
Mulieres comedunt. 
Gallinas comedunt! 
Plurimas gallinas comedunt! 
Gallinae assatae sunt. 
Opipare assatae! 
Mulieres in alto silentio gallinas comedunt.
Vulpes quoque gallinas comedere vult. 
Sed gallinas non habet.
Vulpes mulieribus dicit, 
"Vos gallinas comeditis in silentio. 
Sed clamores sunt si ego gallinas comedo. 
Canes latrant si tantum unam gallinam comedo. 
Vos omnes hypocritae estis!"
Mulier respondet, 
"Et tu pessima animalium es, vulpes! 
Nos comedimus gallinas quae nostrae sunt. 
Tu alienas gallinas comedere vis. 
Fur es, et fur semper eris!"
Vulpes triste abit, dum mulieres comedunt.



Dictionary help:

abit —  alienas —  alto —  ambulat —  animalium —  assatae —  canes —  catervam —  cibo —  clamores —  cogitat —  comedere —  comedimus —  comeditis —  comedo —  comedunt —  de —  dicit —  dum —  ego —  eris —  es —  est —  estis —  esuriens —  et —  fur —  gallinae —  gallinam —  gallinas —  habet —  hypocritae —  in —  iuxta —  latrant —  mulier —  mulieres —  mulieribus —  mulierum —  non —  nos —  nostrae —  omnes —  opipare —  pessima —  plurimas —  quae —  quoque —  respondet —  sed —  semper —  si —  silentio —  sunt —  tantum —  transit —  triste —  tu —  unam —  videt —  villam —  villanarum —  vis —  vos —  vulpes —  vult 

Here is the version of the fable in Mille Fabulae et Una:

Mille Fabulae et Una: 54. Vulpes et Mulieres. 
Vulpes, iuxta villam quandam transiens, conspexit catervam mulierum plurimas gallinas, opipare assatas, alto silentio comedentem. Ad quas conversa, “Qui clamores,” inquit, “et canum latratus contra me essent, si ego facerem quod vos facitis!” Cui respondens quaedam anus, “Pessima animalium,” inquit, “nos quae nostra sunt comedimus; tu aliena furaris.”

And here is an English version of the fable. This is not a translation; it's another version of the same story in 100 English words.

100-Words: The Fox and the Old Women
A fox was walking along when he saw some old women feasting on a roasted chicken. The food smelled delicious, and the fox was very hungry. "It just isn't fair," thought the fox to himself.
He then addressed the old women. "My good ladies," said the fox, "just imagine what an outcry there would be if I were to do what you are doing right now, eating a chicken like that!"
"There's no comparison!" one of the women shouted back, laughing at the fox. "We're eating our own chicken, while you steal and eat chickens that don't belong to you."


2 comments:

Rob said...

Would you say “Opipare assatae!” Is obscure? The link to Opipare says it has appeared less than 50 times. Presumably that means in known works.

Laura Gibbs said...

It appears in the source I used, and I liked it, so I kept it. That's why I'm providing dictionary help; I'm not checking works for frequency, and I'm freely using medieval vocabulary too, linking to the Logeion site as needed for what's not at Wiktionary. :-)