Thursday, January 19, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: January 19

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest or the Distich Poems Board.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quartum decimum Kalendas Februarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Atalanta and the Boar, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Vae soli (English: Woe to the one who is alone).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Beneficium saepe dare, docere est reddere (English: To often do favors teaches others how to return them).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is In Orci culum incidas (English: May you fall into Orcus's butthole, a memorable curse from Erasmus's Adagia 2.10.68).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Pluris est oculatus testis, unus quam auriti decem: An eye witnesse is of more value, then tenne are witnesses, that is to say, farre more credite is to be given to suche as report the thinge they sawe with their eyes, than ten such as speake, but by heare say.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Dies Clarissima. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Ex parvo satis.
From little, enough.

Timendi causa est nescire.
Ignorance is the cause of fear.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Corvus et Mercurius, a story about a duplicitous crow (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Concubinae Duae, in which a man has two lovers.

Vir et Uxores Duae

Alchemical Latin Reader. Below you will find an animated gif that shows all 50 of the emblems from Michael Maier's Atalanta fugiens; for more information, see this blog post.

Monday, January 16, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: January 16

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem septimum decimum Kalendas Februarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Atlas, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Fugit hora, ora (English: Time is flying: pray).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Cura facit canos (English: Worry makes grey hairs).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Est verum verbum: frangit Deus omne superbum (English: Here is a true saying: God shatters everything that is proud).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Diliges proximum tuum, sicut te ipsum (Gal. 5:14). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Damna Dierum. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:


Amicus est unus animus in duobus corporibus.
A friend is one soul in two bodies.

Non timeo, sed caveo.
I am not afraid, but I am cautious.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Asinus et Grammaticus , a funny story about a sneaky teacher (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Grus et Lupus, a famous story about the danger of doing favors for wolves, real and metaphorical.

lupus et grus

Alchemical Latin Reader. Since it has an animal theme, I wanted to include this latest item from my project on alchemical emblems, and for detailed information about the Latin, see this blog post: Pullus a nido volans. Plus, it has music!



And here's a new Latin LOLBaby from Brazil:


Friday, January 13, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: January 13

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. Don't forget about the Latin LOLCat Randomizer, and there's also a LatinLOLCat Board at Pinterest.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): Idus Ianuariae, the Ides of January.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Arion, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is In veritate victoria (English: In truth, victory).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Qualis sit quilibet pastor, lupus adveniens indicat (English: You can see what kind of shepherd someone is when the wolf approaches).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Sine Cerere et Baccho friget Venus. (English: Without Ceres and Bacchus, Venus grows cold, i.e. Without bread and wine, love grows cold).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἀσφαλέστερον τοῦ λέγειν τὸ σιγᾷν (English: Silence is more reliable than speech).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Vita Quae Praeteriit. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Grata sume manu.
Take things with a grateful hand.

Libros paucos legere utilius, quam multos habere.
It is more useful to read a few books than to have a great many of them.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Perdix et Auceps, a fable about disloyalty.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Rusticus et Coluber, a story of how no good deed goes unpunished (this fable has a vocabulary list).

rusticus et coluber

Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: φωνὴ βοῶντος ἐν τῇ ἐρήμῳ. Vox clamantis in deserto. The voice of one crying in the wilderness.


Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: January 10

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: Fables, Proverbs and Distichs — Free PDFs.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quartum Idus Ianuarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Return of Persephone, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Venit hora (English: The hour is coming).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Terra devoratrix omnium (English: Earth is the devourer of all things)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Discipulus est prioris posterior dies (English: The following day is the student of the previous day). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Equi dentes inspicere donati (English: To look a gift horse in the mouth; from Adagia 4.5.24 ... and of course it's not nice to check to see how old the horse is, kind of like looking for a price tag!).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Tempus Volubile. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Altiora spero.
I hope for higher things.

Unus flos non facit ver.
One flower does not make a spring.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Fortuna et Puer , a story about luck and personal responsibility (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Mors et Pauper, a story about the will to live.

Senex et Mors

Alchemical Latin Reader. Below you will find an alchemical emblem, and for detailed information about the Latin, see this blog post: Portavit eum ventus in ventre suo.


These items from Atalanta fugiens have beautiful fugues that go with them too! Here is the one that goes with today's emblem:

 

Saturday, January 7, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: January 7

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest or the Distich Poems Board.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): antediem septimum Idus Ianuarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Heracles and the Snakes, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Diu delibera (English: Ponder at length).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Post calamitatem memoria alia est calamitas (English: After disaster the memory of it is yet another disaster).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Rhodiorum oraculum (English: A Rhodian oracle; from Adagia 2.6.44; this refers to be seek guidance about a trivial matter; when the people of Rhodes asked an oracle of Athena whether to use bronzeware or stoneware in their rituals, along with other such questions, the divine oracle became indignant and answered: neither).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Multitudo imperatorum Cariam perdidit: The multitude of rules destroied the countrey of Caria. This countrey was sumtime a very florishing realme, and by the discorde and dissention of the citizens amonges themselves, while everie man strove to be a Lorde, it was brought at last to a thinge of naught. Wherfore this Proverbe advertiseth us, that nothinge is more noysome, nor more pestiferous to a common weale, then the over muche libertie of a multitude, wher no man chieflie is obeied, but everie man doth as him lusteth. This unlafull libertie or licence of the multitude is called an Anarchie. A mischiefe surely in maner worse then any Tyrannie.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Res In Se Recurrentes. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Alter ego est amicus.
A friend is another self.

Non deest spes.
There is no lack of hope.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Cancer et Filius Eius , a fable about hypocrisy (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Rana et Leo, a story about a frog... a very loud frog.

Leo et Rana

Evan Millner's Fables. I thought you might enjoy Evan Millner's marvelous fable videos; they are available at YouTube. This fable provides a good contrast to the proverb about Caria above!



Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: January 4

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): pridie Nonas Ianuarias, the day before the Nones of January.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Bellerophon, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Florebo quocumque ferar (English: I will flourish wherever I end up).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Auribus lupum teneo (English: I'm holding the wolf by the ears).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Cattus de caseo tarde depellitur eso (English: It is too late to drive the cat away from the cheese once it's already been eaten).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Interrogate de semitis antiquis, quae sit via bona, et ambulate in ea (Jer. 6:16). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Omnia Tempus Habent. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Igne quid utilius?
What is more useful than fire?

Occasio capienda est.
You must seize the opportunity.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Lupus et Puer Mendax, the famous story of the boy who cried wolf (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Gallus et Fures, the tale of an unfortunate rooster.

Fures et Gallus

Latin Fables Read by Justin Slocum Bailey. Here is today's audio fable: Vulpes Sine Cauda, with links to the audio and to the blog post.

Vulpes et Cauda Detruncata

Sunday, January 1, 2017

Special Edition: Kalendae Ianuariae

I made some new "annual" Latin LOLCats for the New Year! :-)


Once a year you get to go wild.



The year, not the field, brings the harvest.



Alas, the fleeting years slip by!



Nothing is more swift than the years.