Saturday, November 5, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 5

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): Nonae Novembres, the Nones of November.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Thetis Consoling Achilles, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Meliora spero (English: I hope for better things).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Ense animus maior. (English: The mind [i.e. reason] is more powerful than the sword)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Qui gladio ferit, gladio perit (English: He who wounds by the sword, dies by the sword). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Improbe Neptunum accusat, qui iterum naufragium facit (English: It's dishonest to blame Neptune for the second shipwreck).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Asinus portans mysteria (English: The donkey carrying the icons; from Adagia 2.2.4 ... as in the Aesop's fable: Asinus Res Sacras Portans).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Vincula Mortis. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Metus cum venit, rarum habet somnus locum.
With the onset of fear, there's little room for sleep.

Avarus animus nullo satiatur lucro.
The greedy soul is satisfied by no amount of profit.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Alauda, Pulli, et Agri Dominus, the story of a wise mother bird (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Ranae Duae et Puteus, the story of two frogs: one reckless, and one cautious.

Ranae Duae et Puteus

Words from Mythology. For more about GEOLOGY and the goddess GAIA, see this blog post.


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