Saturday, June 4, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 4

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): pridie Nonas Iunias, the day before the Nones of June this Sunday.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Heracles and the Lion; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Spes infracta (English: My hope is unbroken).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Post amara dulcia (English: Sweet things come after bitter things).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Multa fercula, multos morbos (English: Many dishes, many diseases). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Nusquam melius morimur homines, quam ubi libenter viximus (English: People can never have a better death than when they have lived as they wished).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Canis in praesepi (English: The dog in the manger; from Adagia 1.10.13; this dog is notorious for keeping the oxen away from the hay, even though he doesn't eat hay himself).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Sat Cito, Si Sat Bene. Click here for a full-sized view. I'm sharing these with English translations at Google+ now too.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Mente manuque.
By thought and hand.

Suis rebus contentum esse maximae sunt divitiae.
The greatest wealth is to be content with what is yours.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Boves et Plaustrum, a story about who does the work and who does the complaining.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Asinus Animalia Fugans et Leo, a story about a loud-mouthed donkey (this fable has a vocabulary list).

asinus et leo

Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: ὁ ἄγγελος εἶπεν ταῖς γυναιξίν, μὴ φοβεῖσθε ὑμεῖς. Angelus dixit mulieribus: Nolite timere. The angel said unto the women: Fear not ye.


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