Sunday, August 30, 2015

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: August 30

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium Kalendas Septembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Theseus and the Minotaur; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Dulcis somnus operanti (English: Sweet is sleep for the one who labors).

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is Amico Hercule (English: With Hercules as my friend).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is one of the labors of Hercules! Maluisses cloacas Augeae purgare (English: You would have preferred to clean the sewers of Augeas). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Minus saepe pecces, si scias, quid nescias (English: You would make fewer mistakes if you knew what you don't know).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Furemque fur cognoscit, et lupum lupus (English: Thief knows thief, wolf knows wolf; from Adagia 2.3.63).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Nil Ultra Vires. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Audi, vide, tace, si vis vivere in pace.
Listen, look and be silent if you wish to live in peace.

Ne fronti crede.
Don't trust appearances.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Leo, Vacca, Capra, et Ovis, the famous story of the lion's share (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Lupus Ovis Pelle Indutus, a fable about a wolf in sheep's clothing.

Lupus in Pelle Ovis

Words from Mythology. For more about the Trojan hero Hector and the English verb "to hector," see this blog post.


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