Saturday, December 20, 2014

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 20

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium decimum Kalendas Ianuarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Seven Against Thebes; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Irrideo tempestatem (English: I scoff at the storm).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Nihil diu occultum (English: Nothing remains long hidden).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Dat veniam corvis, vexat censura columbas (English: The censor forgives the crows and harasses the doves). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Quod est venturum, sapiens ut praesens cavet (English: The wise man guards against what is to come as if it were already here).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Mortuo leoni et lepores insultant (English: Even rabbits insult the dead lion; from Adagia 4.7.82).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Tu Mihi Omnia. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Veneris quis gaudia nescit?
Who knows not the joys of Venus?

Vita sine litteris mors est.
Life without literature is death.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Monedula Liberata , a sad story of unexpected consequences (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Mulus et Equus, a story in praise of the simple life.

Equus Superbus et Asinus

TODAY'S LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS

The Latin holiday songs for today are: Gaudium Mundo, along with Deus paret, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "Bóg się rodzi" and also Prope accedamus, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "Przystąpmy do szopy." You can find more at the Gaudium Mundo blog.



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