Monday, November 3, 2014

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 3

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Brevissima: 1001 Tiny Latin Poems, it's ready and waiting.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium Nonas Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Medea and the Daughters of Pelias; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Diligamus invicem (English: Let us love one another).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Volenti nil difficile (English: For one who is willing, nothing is difficult).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Ducito bovem volentem (English: Lead the ox that is willing).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Dei facientes adiuvant (English: The gods help those who are doers).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Sine Cerere et Baccho friget Venus (English: Without Ceres (bread) and Bacchus (wine), Venus (love) grows cold; from Adagia 2.3.97).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ὦ ὁῖα κεφαλὴ, καὶ ἐγκέφαλον οὐκ ἔχει. (English: Oh, what a head, but it has no brains - as the fox said to the mask in Aesop's fable).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Non Sine Causa. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Omnis est rex in domo sua.
Each man is king in his own home.

Quis amicior quam frater fratri?
Who is a greater friend than a brother is to his brother?

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Mus in Olla, the story of a greedy mouse's sad demise (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Serpens Calcata et Apollo, the story of Apollo's advice to a trodden-upon serpent.

Serpens Calcatus et Iuppiter

Latin Fables Read by Justin Slocum Bailey. Here is today's audio fable: Leo et Unicornis, with links to the audio and to the blog post.



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