Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: August 6

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for more fables to read (LOTS more fables), you can download a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem octavum Idus Augustas.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Aeneas and Turnus; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Rem omnem considera (English: Consider the whole business).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Deliberando discitur sapientia (English: By pondering, wisdom is learned).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Mortis linque metus, si tu vis vivere laetus (English: Put aside any fears of death, if you want to live happily).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Nolite solliciti esse animae quid manducetis, neque corpori quid vestiamini (Luke 12:22). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Satius est recurrere, quam currere male: Better it is to runne backe againe, than to runne forth amisse. Many be eyther so shamefast, or els so stricte in theyr own opinion, that they had lever runne forth still in errour and out of the way, than to apply them selves to better and more holsome counsailes.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Spes et Fides. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Pater, Filii, et Agrorum Cultura, a great story about parenting and the work ethic.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Platanus et Viatores, a wonderful story about a tree and the ungrateful humans who enjoy her shade (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Platanus et Viatores

Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: φεῦγε εἰς αἴγυπτον, καὶ ἴσθι ἐκεῖ ἕως ἂν εἴπω σοι. Fuge in Aegyptum, et esto ibi usque dum dicam tibi. Flee into Egypt, and be thou there until I bring thee word.

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