Monday, March 31, 2014

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: March 31

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): pridie Kalendas Apriles, the day before the Kalends of April.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Cupid Discovers Psyche; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Semper sursum (English: Always upwards).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Acti iucundi labores (English: Hard work, once completed, is pleasant).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Si satis est, multum est (English: If it is enough, it is a great deal). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Etiam capillus unus habet umbram suam (English: Even a single hair has its shadow).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Ibyci grues (English: The cranes of Ibycus; from Adagia 1.9.22; you can read about the cranes, the avengers of Ibycus, at Wikipedia).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Laetamur Graviora Passi. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:




TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Harundo et Quercus, a story about how it is better to bend rather than break.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Aquila et Sagitta, the story of the eagle, the arrow, and the eagle's own feather (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Aquila et Sagitta

Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: ἀπὸ τῶν παιδίων τῶν Εβραίων τοῦτο. De infantibus Hebraeorum est hic. This is one of the Hebrews' children.


No comments: