Thursday, October 24, 2013

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: October 24

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin, it's available (my project from summer of 2010); this is the source for the Latin fable below.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem nonum Kalendas Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Arion; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Post virtutem curro (English: I run in pursuit of excellence).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Quaerite et invenietis (English: Seek, and ye shall find).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Discite victuri, sed vivite cras morituri (English: Learn as if you were going to live, but live as if you were going to die tomorrow).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Sapientia absconsa et thesaurus invisus: quae utilitas in utrisque? (Sirach 20:30). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Teneo tamquam digitos: I can it as perfit as my pater noster, I can saye it on my fingers endes.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Vita Hominis. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:




TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Taurus et Culex, the story of a self-important insect.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Struthiocamelus Perfidus, the story of the ambiguous ostrich (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Struthiocamelus Perfidus

Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: λάβετε φάγετε, τοῦτό ἐστιν τὸ σῶμά μου. Accipite, et comedite: hoc est corpus meum. Take, eat; this is my body.


Myth and Folklore Books. I'm accumulating some book recommendations for the classes I teach and wanted to share them here. Today's book is Polish Fairy Tales by A. J. Glinski; you can see the table of contents here. This is a free Amazon Kindle eBook, and you don't need a Kindle to read it - you can read Kindle books on any computer or mobile device, or you can use the Amazon Cloud Reader in your browser.




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