Thursday, June 20, 2013

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 20

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. Now that summer is here, I'm working away on the English-language proverbs. You can see what's going on over there at my new blog, The Proverb Laboratory, and I'm also accumulating some good, simple stories in English for the Empirical Grammar project - including some Greek and Roman legends.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Aeneas and the Ghost of Creusa; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is In meliora spera (English: Have hope for better things).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Veritas vos liberabit (English: The truth will set you free).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Qui nimium fatur, stultissimus esse probatur (English: He who speaks too much, proves himself to be an utter fool).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Crastinus dies sollicitus erit sibi ipse (Matt. 6:34). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Non semper erit aestas: It will not alweyes be sommer, take tyme when tyme cometh, for occasion will not alwey serve, when the iron ys whote we must strike, least hit be colde agayne.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Tibi Facient Rursum. Click here for a full-sized view; the poem has a vocabulary list and an English translation, too.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:




TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Anser et Ova Aurea, the story of the goose that laid the golden eggs!

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Membra et Venter, the famous story of what happened when the limbs of the body went on strike (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Membra et Venter

Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: ἀφεῖλεν τὴν κεφαλὴν αὐτοῦ ἀπ᾽ αὐτοῦ. Abscidit caput eius. She took away his head from him.




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