Thursday, March 14, 2013

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: March 14

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): pridie Idus Martias, the day before the Ides of March.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Pasiphae and the Minotaur; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Scienter utor (English: I enjoy things wisely).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Omnium rerum vicissitudo (English: There is change in all things)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Nullum magnum ingenium sine mixtura dementiae (English: There is no great talent without an admixture of madness). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Quid tibi pecunia opus est, si uti non potes? (English: What do you need money for, if you can't use it?).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Sub omni lapide scorpius dormit (English: Under every rock sleeps a scorpion; from Adagia 1.4.34).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Ut Sis Tibi Amicus. Click here for a full-sized view; the poem has a vocabulary list and an English translation, too.


And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES AND SONGS:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Muscae et Mel, the story of the flies and some fatal honey.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Canes et Agricola Penuria Laborans, the sad story of a farm in a time of famine (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Canes et Rusticus (de fame) - Osius

Greek Bible Art
- and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: Μελχισεδεκ βασιλεὺς Σαλημ ἐξήνεγκεν ἄρτους καὶ οἶνον. - Melchisedech rex Salem, proferens panem et vinum. - Melchizedek king of Salem brought forth bread and wine.



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