Saturday, September 29, 2012

Round-Up: September 29

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Brevissima: 1001 Tiny Latin Poems, it's ready and waiting, and you can also get a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin. If you prefer the heft of a book in your hand, you can get the books in printed form from Lulu.com.

HODIE: ante diem tertium Kalendas Octobres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Athena and Poseidon; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.



TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Vetera transierunt (English: The old things have passed away).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Alis et animo (English: With wings and spirit).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is orcellum alens, porcum habebis (English: Raising a piglet, you'll have a pig).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Beati pauperes spiritu (English: Blessed are the poor in spirit).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Semper aliquis in Cydonis domo (English: There's always someone in Cydon's house; from Adagia 2.2.15 - Cydon was a citizen of Corinth who was proverbial for his hospitality).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἀφροδίτῃ ὗν τέθυκεν (English: He's sacrificed a pig for Aphrodite... which is just the wrong thing to do - especially since a wild boar killed her lover Adonis, Aphrodite has had no love for pigs).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Fac Bene Dum Vivis: O dives, dives, non omni tempore vives! / Fac bene, dum vivis, post mortem vivere si vis.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:



TODAY'S FABLES:

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Farmer's Treasure, a story of the treasure that is hard work.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Vespertilio, Rubus, et Mergus, the story of why the bat flies at night, among other things.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Pater, Filius, et Asinus, the famous story of how you cannot please everyone (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Pater, Filius et Asinus

Thursday, September 27, 2012

Round-Up: September 27

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem quintum Kalendas Octobres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Penelope and Eurycleia; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Deus providebit (English: God will provide).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Fortuna levis dea (English: Luck is a fickle goddess)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Ex luna scientia (English: From the moon, knowledge). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Nisi per te sapias, frustra sapientem audias (English: Unless you can wise up, it's a waste of time for you to listen to a wise man).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Litem moves de asini prospectu (English: You're making a lawsuit out of the peeping of a donkey; from Adagia 1.3.64 - the full story is told in an Aesop's fable).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Aurum Omnia Vincit: Quae neque vi poteris neque duro vincere ferro, / Aurum adhibe: cedent protinus illa tibi.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:



TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Mercurius, Homo, et Formicae, one of my all-time favorite fables (this fable has a vocabulary list).

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Eagle and the Serpent, the story of an eagle who got more than he bargained for when he grabbed a snake.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Formicae et Cicada, the famous story of the ant and the fun-loving grasshopper.

Formica et Cicada

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Round-Up: September 25

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm almost making good progress on my latest project - you can see the growing collection of Latin-vocabulary-via-proverbs at the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

HODIE: ante diem septimum Kalendas Octobres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Odysseus and the Sirens; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Labor omnia vincit (English: Hard work overcomes all things - the state motto of Oklahoma!).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Tempus omnia revelat (English: Time reveals all things).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Ebibe vas totum, si vis cognoscoere potum (English: Drain the whole cup, if you want to know the drink).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Unus interitus est hominis et iumentorum (Ecc. 3:19). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Dictum ac factum: Is a proverbe signifienge all mannes diligence and laboure necessarie to the doynge or bringinge to pass of any thinge. Donatus sayeth Dictum ac factum to be a proverbiall speakinge, betokeninge celeritie and spede yn doinge or dispatchinge of a thinge.

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Lingua Una, Aures Duae: Ut nos pauca loqui, plura autem audire moneret, / Linguam unam natura, duas dedit omnibus aures

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:



TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Canis et Umbra, the story of the greedy dog who was fooled by his own reflection (this fable has a vocabulary list).

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Deer and The Lion, an "out of the frying pan, into the fire" type of story!

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Ovis et Canis Calumniosus, the sad story of the sheep who was condemned based on the testimony of false witnesses.

canis et ovis

Sunday, September 23, 2012

Round-Up: September 23

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Brevissima: 1001 Tiny Latin Poems, it's ready and waiting, and you can also get a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin. If you prefer the heft of a book in your hand, you can get the books in printed form from Lulu.com.

HODIE: ante diem nonum Kalendas Octobres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Athena and Poseidon; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.




TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Experto credite (English: Trust someone with experience).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Virtutis praemium felicitas (English: Happiness is the reward of excellence).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Equo currenti non opus calcaribus (English: There's no need to spur a running horse).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Hilarem datorem diligit deus (English: God loves someone who gives cheerfully).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Liberorum amantior quam Gello (English: More fond of children than Gello; from Adagia 2.8.28 - Gello was something like La Llorona, a woman who had no children of her own who then as a ghost would attack or steal children).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Χελώην Πεγάσῳ συγκρίνεις (English: You're comparing a tortoise to Pegasus).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Lingua Docet Quid Lateat: Sermo refert mores; animus sic proditur ore: / Quid lateat tacito pectore, lingua docet.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:




TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Ranae Duae et Puteus, the story of two frogs - one cautious, one not (this fable has a vocabulary list).

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Bird and the Arrow, the story of a bird who brought about his own demise.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Iuppiter et Serpens, the story of the snake who wanted to give Zeus a wedding present.

Serpens, Rosa, et Iuppiter


Friday, September 21, 2012

Round-Up: September 21

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem undecimum Kalendas Octobres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Pandora; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Corde manuque (English: With heart and hand).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Sapientia sanitas animi (English: Wisdom is the health of mind)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Procul a Iove, procul a fulmine (English: Far from Jupiter, far from his thunderbolt). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Incertus animus dimidium est sapientiae (English: A mind that doubts is halfway to wisdom).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Multi qui boves stimulent, pauci aratores (English: Many are those who drive the oxen, but few are the real ploughmen; from Adagia 1.7.9).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Disce Ut Doceas: Et labor et studium doctos genuere magistros; / Quod numquam didicit, nemo docere potest.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:



TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Monachi et Abbates, a wonderful medieval fable about the abbots and the hungry monks (this fable has a vocabulary list).

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Bear and The Bees - even though the bear is big, he feels the stings of those little bees.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Arbores et Homo, the sad story of trees who were their own worst enemies.

Arbores et Securis

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Round-Up: September 19

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm almost making good progress on my latest project - you can see the growing collection of Latin-vocabulary-via-proverbs at the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

HODIE: ante diem tertium decimum Kalendas Octobres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Odysseus in the Court of Alcinous ; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is ulneror, non vincor (English: I am wounded, not defeated).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Caritas omnia potest (English: Love can do all things).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Disce, quid es, quid eris: memor esto, quod morieris (English: Learn what you are, and what you will be: remember that you will die).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Diligite iustitiam, qui iudicatis terram (Wisdom 1:1). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Veritas simplex oratio: Trouthes tale is simple, he that meaneth good faith, goeth not about to glose his communicacion with painted wordes. Plaine and homely men call a figge, a figge, and a spade a spade. Rhetorike and coloringe of spech, proved manye times a mans matter to be naught.

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Libris Amissis: Qui nil ingenio committit, at omnia libro, / Amissis retinet nil miser ille libris.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:



TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Onager Asino Invidens, the story of an onager who envied the donkey... and then realized his mistake.

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Ass and the Gipsies, another story about the hard life of the pack donkey.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Feles, Aquila, et Sus, the story of a truly wicked little cat (this fable has a vocabulary list). If you look closely, you can see the eagle up on the top branch, the sow down at the bottom, and the cat in the middle:

Aquila, Feles et Aper

Monday, September 17, 2012

September 17: Round-Up

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Brevissima: 1001 Tiny Latin Poems, it's ready and waiting, and you can also get a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin. If you prefer the heft of a book in your hand, you can get the books in printed form from Lulu.com.

HODIE: ante diem quintum decimum Kalendas Octobres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Return of Odysseus; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.



TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Deus avertat (English: May God turn it aside).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Nunquam non paratus (English: Never unprepared).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is In cavea non canit luscinia (English: In a cage, the nightingale does not sing).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Cum sancto sanctus eris, cum perverso perverteris (English: With the holy man you will be holy; with the wicked man you will be wicked).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Charetis pollicitationes (English: The promises of Chares; from Adagia 2.6.84 - Chares was an Athenian general notorious for being quick to make promises and failing to live up to them).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἐγὼ δὲ καὶ σὺ ταυτὸν ἕλκομεν ζυγόν (English: You and I alike are hauling the same yoke).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Omnia Disce: Omnia disce, puer; tuus hic labor unus, at inter / Omnia, disce prius vivere, disce mori.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Vulpes et Mulieres, the wonderful story of the fox and the women feasting on roasted chickens (this fable has a vocabulary list).

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is Mice in Council, the story of "belling the cat."

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Membra et Venter, the story made famous by both Livy and Shakespeare of the dispute between the belly and the rest of the body.

Membra et Venter

Sunday, September 16, 2012

Saturday, September 15, 2012

Round-Up: September 15

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem septimum decimum Kalendas Octobres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Orpheus and Eurydice; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Studiis invigilandum (English: We should stay awake, studying).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Verae amicitiae sempiternae (English: True friendships are eternal)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Excelsior! (English: Higher!). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Perdidisse honeste mallem quam accepisse turpiter (English: I'd rather have lost everything honestly than to have ill-gotten gains).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Totus echinus asper (English: The whole hedgehog is prickly; from Adagia 2.9.59).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Iudex Sibi: Cum te aliquis laudat, iudex tuus esse memento; / Plus aliis de te quam tu tibi credere noli.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES
:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Canis Vetulus et Magister, a story about an old dog his ungrateful master.

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is Jove's Cask, which is Aesop's version of the story of Pandora and her box - without Pandora.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Asinus et Tympana, the sad story of the donkey who got beaten even after he was dead (this fable has a vocabulary list).

negotiator et asinus

Thursday, September 13, 2012

Round-Up: September 13

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm almost making good progress on my latest project - you can see the growing collection of Latin-vocabulary-via-proverbs at the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

HODIE: Idus Septembres, the Ides of September.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Orpheus and the Animals; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.



TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS
:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Virtus depressa resurget (English: Excellence, though cast down, will rise again).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Personas gerimus fictas (English: We wear counterfeit masks).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Ars compensabit, quod vis tibi parva negabit (English: Talent will make up for what your slight strength denies you).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Nolite iudicare, et non iudicabimini (Luke 6:37). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Unus vir nullus vir: One man no man. One man lefte alone, and forsaken of all the reste, can do little good.

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Vita Aliena Magistra: Multorum disce exemplo, quae facta sequaris, / Quae fugias: vita est nobis aliena magistra.



And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES
:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Ranae et Puer, the story of a boy who threw rocks at the frogs.

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is Horse and Man, the story of how the horse became enslaved to man.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Canes et Agricola Penuria Laborans, the story of a dogs in a dangerous time (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Canes et Rusticus (de fame) - Osius

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Round-Up: September 11

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Brevissima: 1001 Tiny Latin Poems, it's ready and waiting, and you can also get a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin. If you prefer the heft of a book in your hand, you can get the books in printed form from Lulu.com.

HODIE: ante diem tertium Idus Septembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Cleopatra; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.



TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Cuique suum (English: To each his own - one of my own personal mottoes!).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Cito, tuto, iucunde (English: Swiftly, safely, and happily).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Pisces vorant maiores minores (English: The bigger fish eat the littler ones).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Non est opus valentibus medico (English: People who are well have no need of a doctor).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Neoptolemi vindicta (English: Neoptolemus's revenge; from Adagia 1.1.90 - this refers to the way a wrong someone does to others comes back to haunt him, as Achilles's son Neoptolemus killed Priam at an altar, and so too Neoptolemus was later killed at an altar).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Χαλεπὰ τὰ καλά (English: The things that are beautiful are difficult).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Rerum Sapientia Custos: Optima gestarum rerum, sapientia custos, / Aeternis condens, fortia facta, libris.


And here is today's proverbial lolcat: Bonus liber amicus optimus.


TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Bos Fimum Evehens, a funny little story about the bull and his manure (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Cassita et Auceps, the story of a how a wise little bird cared for her chicks.

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Woodman and the Trees, a story about trees who were the own worst enemy.


Sunday, September 9, 2012

Round-Up: September 9

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem quintum Idus Septembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Thetis Consoling Achilles; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.



TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Perseveranti dabitur (English: To the one who perseveres, it will be given).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Omnia possibilia credenti (English: All things are possible for one who believes)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Asinus asellum culpat (English: The donkey finds fault with the jackass). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Animo imperato, ne tibi animus imperet (English: Keep your feelings under control, so that your feelings do not control you).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Aquilam noctuae comparas (English: You're comparing an eagle to an owl; from Adagia 1.9.18).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Iudicium Populi: Iudicium populi numquam contempseris unus, / Ne nulli placeas, dum vis contemnere multos.

I've made a Lolcat widget now - it's available as a 400-pixel size, or 200-pixel size if you prefer! You can get the script here! :-)



TODAY'S FABLES:

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Two Wallets, the story of our virtues and our vices.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Graculus et Avarus, a wonderful fable about a greedy human and a thieving bird (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Asinus Res Sacras Portans, the story of a self-important donkey.

Asinus Sacra Portans


Friday, September 7, 2012

Round-Up: September 7

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm almost making good progress on my latest project - you can see the growing collection of Latin-vocabulary-via-proverbs at the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

HODIE: ante diem septimum Idus Septembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Circe and Scylla; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Vincit omnia veritas (English: Truth conquers all).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Date obolum Belisario (English: Given a penny to Belisarius - you can read about the legend of Belisarius the beggar at Wikipedia).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Una serena dies multas pellit cito nubes (English: One clear day swiftly drives away many clouds).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Nudus egressus sum de utero matris meae et nudus revertar illuc (Job 1:21). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Intempestiva benevolentia nihil a simultate differt: Unseasonable friendship differeth litle from enmitie. Many there be which while they studie to do a man good do him muche harme, or otherwise be moleste and grevous unto him, forasmuch as they have no respecte ne consideracion of the time.

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Visne Bonus Dici? Ficta parum constant: quod haberi poscis, id esto! / Visne bonus dici? Cura sit esse bonum.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES
:

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Two Crabs, a story about parental hypocrisy.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Feles et Venus, the fabulous story of what happened when Venus turned a cat into a woman.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Aquila et Vulpes, the dramatic story of what happened when the eagle stole the fox's pups (this fable has a vocabulary list).

vulpes et aquila



Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Round-Up: September 5

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Brevissima: 1001 Tiny Latin Poems, it's ready and waiting, and you can also get a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin. If you prefer the heft of a book in your hand, you can get the books in printed form from Lulu.com.

HODIE: Nonae Septembres, the Nones of September.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Venus and Anchises; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Interiora vide (English: Look within).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Sub pondere sursum (English: Bearing my load, rising upward).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Sunt asini multi solum bino pede fulti (English: There are many donkeys, except that they stand on two legs).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Inter os et offam multum interest (English: Much can happen between the morsel and the mouth).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Cannacae more plorare (English: To weep like Cannacas; from Adagia 2.8.19 - Cannacas was a legendary king of Phyrgia who anticipated that a great flood would destroy his country and people, so he went to the temple and wept, begging the gods to avert the flood).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἐλέφας μῦν οὐ δάκνει (English: An elephant doesn't bite a mouse... in other words: don't sweat the small stuff).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Nomen Magnum: Non umquam magnum te dicam nomen habere, / Ni vere magno nomine digna geras.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES
:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Vulpes in Puteum Delapsa et Lupus, a funny little story about a fox who is in desperate need of the wolf's assistance (this fable has a vocabulary list).

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Trumpeter Taken Prisoner, a story that can apply to any war, ancient or modern.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Luscinia et Accipiter, the famous story of the hungry hawk and the sweet-tongued nightingale.

Accipiter et Luscinia