Saturday, August 4, 2012

Round-Up: August 4

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm using Google+ a lot these days - highly recommended as a thought-provoking place to hang out online!

HODIE: pridie Nonas Augustas.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Solon and Croesus; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Scientia nobilitat (English: Knowledge ennobles).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Pauci sed boni (English: Few men, but good ones).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Humana sub cute plurimae latent ferae (English: Beneath a person's skin lurk many wild beasts).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Qui festinat ditescere, non erit innocens (English: He who is in a hurry to get rich will not stay innocent).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Fato Metelli Romae fiunt consules (English: By sheer luck the Metelli have become consuls at Rome; from Adagia 4.10.62 - These words, attributed to the poet Naevius, did not please the Metelli whatsoever; the proverb refers to those who attain their high social status through dumb luck, rather than talent).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἀνάγκῃ οὐδὲ θεοὶ μάχονται (English: Not even the gods can do battle with necessity).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Hora Nulla Sine Fructu, Sic fac ut nulla sine fructu transeat hora: / Sic fit hora brevis et labor ipse levis. (Note the nice rhyme: brevis-levis!)

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES WIDGET: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Culex et Leo, the story of the ups and downs of the life of gnat (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE WIDGET: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Vulpes in Puteum Delapsa et Lupus, the story of a fox who needed help from a wolf.

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is Jupiter and the Cat, the hilarious story of the cat who became a woman.

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