Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Round-Up: June 19

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. As I finished working my way through the fables in Mille Fabulae et Una chunk by chunk, I'll be working my way through the book from the beginning this time around, choosing out favorite fables along the way.

HODIE: ante diem tertium decimum Kalendas Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Ghost of Creusa; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Luctor, at emergam (English: I struggle, but I will rise up).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Veritas vos liberabit (English: The truth will set you free).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Non lapis hirsutus fit per loca multa volutus (English: A stone does not get hairy when it is rolled through many places - in other words, a rolling stone gathers no moss).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Crastinus dies sollicitus erit sibi ipse (Matt. 6:34). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Canes timidi vehementius latrant: Fearefull dogges do barke the sorer. Greate braggers commonly be least fighters, and most cowardes, even as the most barking dogges, be for the most part lest biters.

TODAY'S FABLES and STORIES:

ANECDOTE OF THE DAY: Today's anecdote is Mala Hesperidum, the story of how Hercules obtained the golden apples of the Hesperides.

FABULAE FACILES WIDGET: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Accipiter Columbam Insequens, the story of a hawk beginning for mercy (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE WIDGET: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Agnus et Lupus, Bibentes, the famous story of the wolf who met a lamb drinking at the stream.

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Bear and the Fox, the story of a fox who rebuked the bear for his hypocrisy.

MILLE FABULAE: Here's a favorite fable from Mille Fabulae et Una: Leo Furens et Caprea, about life in a world with lions: Conspecto leone furente, “O miseram et infelicem conditionem bestiarum,” inquit caprea, “siquidem etiam furiosos habiturae sumus leones, quorum mentis et rationis compotum saevitiam intolerabilem esse experimur.”

Leo Mente Captus et Caprea

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