Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Round-Up: June 8

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem sextum Idus Iunias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is MULTUS - read a brief essay about the word at my new Verbosum blog. Plus, I did today's vocabulary challenge, with these words: transmitto - arma - enclitic ve - a - verus. Try to put those words into a sentence yourself... and then see what I came up with.

MORE FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
I've picked out my favorite one, the story of the snake and the cat, Serpens, Felis et Mures, to share with you here in the blog:
Serpēns et Fēles in quādam domō pugnābant. Inquilīnī itaque Mūrēs, quī ab utrīsque continuō dēvorābantur, ubī dēcertantēs eōs vīdēre, cavīs īlico exiēre suīs. Ipsī vērō simul ac Mūrēs vīdēre, īrīs sēpositīs, proeliīsque dīmissīs, omnēs in illōs conversī sunt.
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Audax ero (English: I will be bold - and since audax is both feminine and neuter, this motto can work for all you women and men out there!).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Omnia bona desuper (English: All good things are from above - a saying that can go with the fable of the Bona et Mala above)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is Sine labore non erit panis in ore (English: Without work there will be no bread in your mouth). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Bene vixit is, qui potuit, cum voluit, mori (English: A man lived well if he was able to die when he wanted).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Citius quam formicae papaver (English: Faster than an ant carries off a poppy-seed - which is to say, very fast; from Adagia 5.1.2).

Today's image is an amazing illustration for the story of the man who was turned into an ant, Vir qui Formica Fit - it's from the Medici Aesop. I'll have more illustrations from this beautiful edition of Aesop in the next week few weeks. :-)

1 comment:

Tuomo "Squirrel" Hämäläinen said...

Kafka was definetly not first, then.