Thursday, June 24, 2010

Myths & Legends: June 24-30

June 17-23 - June 24-30 - July 1-7

For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Reference Page.

Jason Seizes the Golden Fleece. To find out more about Jason's question for the Golden Fleece, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


The Death of Niobe's Children. To find out more about the boastful Niobe, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


The Trojan Horse. To find out more about the wooden horse built by the Greeks, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Theseus and Ariadne. To find out more about Ariadne and the hero Theseus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Ino and Melicertes. To find out more about Ino, also known as Leucothea, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Echo and Narcissus. To find out more about Echo and her love for Narcissus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Heracles and the Amazons. To find out more about Heracles and the Amazons, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


1 comment:

Philip Brooks said...

I'm intrigued by the mysterious abandonment of Ariadne by Theseus on Naxos.
I can't quite quote the source at this moment but I'm aware that a play was written that treated the event as a comedy, dialog spoken in the vernacular, in which the narrator proposes that ( paraphrasing) "" Devotee of Dionysus" is a euphemism for drunkard"".
That is one approach. But since myths are also Jungian archetypes and subject to Freudian interpretation ( possibly as apt in antiquity as today ) I think that it would be an interesting subject for investigation.
No doubt Joseph Campbell would ascribe the event as a symbolic stage in the hero's ( i.e. Your own ) development. In other words her abandonment may symbolize the passage in life when the youth leaves his/her maternal ally and guide. To continue in intimacy after that milestone would require a type of incestuous or dependent relationship that would be counter productive or destructive to healthy growth and maturation. Perhaps there is a similar psychological symbolism in Jason's abandonment of Medea ?
At any rate, I would like to explore this theme and would be grateful for any assistance, and further insights or suggestions.