Sunday, February 14, 2010

Round-Up: February 14

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem sextum decimum Kalendas Martias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
I've picked out my favorite one, the story of the flies in honey, Muscae, to share with you here in the blog:
Ad mel profūsum in cellā quādam advolantēs muscae, illīus dulcissimō succō iūcundissimē pascēbantur. Sed iam saturae, cum āvolāre vellent, pedibus nītentibus, etiam ālīs in tenāce liquōre haerentibus, moritūrae, "Ō miserae (inquiunt), quantillus nōbīs cibus interitum attulit."
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Tiny Proverbs: Today's tiny proverb is: Momo mordacior (English: More sharp-tongued than Momus - which is very sharp-tongued indeed, as Momus was the critic of the gods!).

3-Word Mottoes Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Forti nihil difficile (English: For the brave man, nothing is difficult - so just be brave, and everything will be easier).

Latin Animal Proverb: Today's animal proverb is Cattus saepe satur cum capto mure iocatur (English: A cat with a full stomach often plays with the mouse it has caught).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Oderint dum metuant (English: Let them hate me, so long as they fear me - those famous words recorded in Suetonius's Life of Caligula).

Proper Name Proverb from Erasmus: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Venereum iusiurandum non punitur (English: The vows of Venus are not enforced - something to keep in mind on Valentine's Day, ha ha; from Adagia 2.4.90).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Λύπης πάσης γίνετ' ἰατρὸς χρόνος (English: Time is the doctor for every grief).

For today's image, here is an illustration for the story of the vulture's birthday party, Vultur et Aviculae:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

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