Friday, January 15, 2010

Round-Up: January 15

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. Plus, you can find some Latin "pipilationes" at my Proverbia Latina feed and at the IVLIVS CAESAR feed (Plutarch's Life of Caesar twittered trilingually).

HODIE: ante diem duodevicesimum Kalendas Februarias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
I've picked out my favorite one, Capones et Cocus, to share with you here in the blog:
Vir quīdam complūrēs cāpōnēs in eōdem ornīthobosciō inclūsōs largō nūtrīcāverat cibō, quī pinguēs effectī sunt omnēs praeter ūnum, quem ut macilentum irrīdēbant frātrēs. Dominus, nōbilēs hospitēs lautō et sumptuōsō acceptūrus convīviō, imperat cocō ut ex hīs interimat coquatque quōs pinguiōrēs invēnerit. Hoc audientēs corpulentī sēsē afflictābant dīcentēs, "Quantō praestitisset nōs macilentōs esse."
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Virtute doloque (English: By strength and by stealth).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Iuniores ad labores (English: The younger ones to the tasks... good advice - and it rhymes!)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is Nemo est supra leges (English: No one is above the laws). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Iratus, cum ad se rediit, sibi tum irascitur (English: When an angry person comes to his senses, he gets angry at himself).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Nunquam efficies, ut recte ingrediantur cancri (English: There's no way you'll be able to make crabs walk straigh; from Adagia 3.7.38 - and it's also the basis for an Aesop's fable, too!).

For an image today, here is an illustration of the fable De Lupo Pastoris Partes Agente:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

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