Sunday, March 8, 2009

Round-Up: March 8

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 21, which includes the ingenious saying invented by Adlai Stevenson: Via ovicipitum dura est.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one about life's ups and downs: Nulla rosa sine spinis.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Trium litterarum homo: fur (English: A man of five letters: thief - although of course the Latin word for thief just has three letters). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Super argentum et aurum gratia bona (Proverbs 22:1). You can use the Javascript to include the Vulgate verse of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Corvus oculum corvi non eruit (English: One crow does not tear out another crow's eye - a bit of "honor among thieves" you might say). You can use the Javascript to include the Animal Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Iuppiter neque pluens neque abstinens omnibus placet (English: Jupiter cannot please everybody when he rains, nor when he refrains from raining - a proverb based on the use of Jupiter as a way to discuss the weather; compare the Aesop's fable about the woman and her two daughters, each of whom prays for different weather). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proper name proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Πόνος γὰρ εὐκλείης πατήρ (English: Hard work is the father of fame - a saying that works nicely in Greek, where the word for hard work is masculine, an apt father of fame). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE VITULA ET BOVE (the story of the heifer who did not know that hard work is the father of fame!). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments. This is another one of those illustrations where you can see two scenes combined in one - if you look carefully in the background, you can see the heifer being led to the sacrificial altar!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

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