Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Round-Up: March 11

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 24, which contains the Latin version of "a word to the wise" - Sapienti dictum sat est.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one which alludes to the Aesop's fable of Mercury and the axes: Fluvius non semper fert secures..

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Inscitia mater arrogantiae (English: Ignorance is the mother of conceit - a truth you will encounter all too often in the academic life, sad to say!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Transivimus per ignem et aquam (Psalms 66:12). You can use the Javascript to include the Vulgate verse of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Nigro rarior cycno (English: More rare than a black swan - a proverbial notion made famous again recently in Nassim Nicholas Taleb's book, The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable). You can use the Javascript to include the Animal Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Evitata Charybdi in Scyllam incidi (English: After having steered clear of Charybdis, I fell into Scylla - a Homeric version of "out of the frying pan, into the fire"). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proper name proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Τὸ σιγᾶν τὴν ἀλήθειαν χρυσόν ἐστι θάπτειν (English: To be silent about the truth is to bury gold - a wonderful saying for those people who, like me, see themselves as obliged to speak up when truth is at stake... despite all those proverbs which say, to the contrary, that silence is golden!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is De Equo et Leone, the story of how the horse saw through the lion's tricks and played a good trick of his own in order to escape.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE MILVO AEGROTO (the marvelous story of the kite's deathbed repentance). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

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