Saturday, February 7, 2009

Round-Up: February 7

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Fabula: De Gallo Gallinaceo, the story of a rooster who is either very wise, or very foolish, depending on how you choose to interpret the fable!

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a rhyming proverb today which I really like: Ebibe vas totum, si vis cognoscere potum.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Absque sanitate nemo felix (English: Without good health, no one is happy - and note that Latin "sanity" does not just mean mental health - although mental health is a very fine thing, to be sure!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἀρχαϊκὰ φρονεῖς (English: You are wise in the ancient things - a fine motto for all readers of this blog no doubt!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is Fable 25: Auceps et Perdix, the story of a partridge who is willing to do anything to save her life.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE CATTA IN FEMINAM MUTATA (the delightful story of the cat who became a woman, but couldn't stop chasing the mice!). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com. DUE TO AN ERROR AT BOLCHAZY-CARDUCCI, the book's publishers, the Amazon listing may read "unavailable." I hope to have this error corrected soon!

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