Thursday, February 5, 2009

Round-Up: February 5

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Ning Blog: I've posted something that might be of interest in my Ning blog: Crossword Puzzles, new crossword puzzles for Fables 1-5 in the book!

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Fabula: De Rustico et Colubro, a story of how no good deed goes unpunished!

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a saying for our current economic crisis: Irus et est subito qui modo Croesus erat..

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Talpa caecior. (English: Blinder than a mole... a very appropriate saying for me this week since I am in process of ordering my first pair of so-called progressive glasses: trifocals! eek!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Πενίν σοφίην ἔλαχεν (English: Poverty has been allotted wisdom - a kind of round-about way of saying that necessity is the mother of genius!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is Fable 22: Vulpes et Lupus, the story of how deeds speak louder than words, especially if you are stuck in a well and need help, as the fox does in this story!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE LEONE ET QUIBUSDAM ALIIS QUADRUPEDIBUS (the famous story of the proverbial lion's share). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com!

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