Wednesday, January 7, 2009

Round-Up: January 7

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 10, which includes one of my favorite Latin sayings: Experientia magistra stultorum (in other words, fools can only learn from the negative results of bad experiences... unlike the wise ones, who are able to think things through in advance!). :-)

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Sapientis est mutare consilium (English: It is for the wise person to change his mind - this is a proverb that I really need to commit to heart; it's so easy to get caught up in a project or plan and to stick with it even when clearly it would be better to take another approach: this proverb tells us it is the wise person who is prepared to do so!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἡ βραχυλογία ἐγγύς ἐστι τοῦ σιγᾷν (English: A short speech is close to keeping silent... more good advice for me today, since I am prone - as you all know - to be long-winded!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE FORMICA ET COLUMBA (the story of the ant and the dove, which is a rather unusual item in the Aesopic tradition, since it is based on positive role models, rather than a negative exemplum). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 73: Leo et Quidam Alii Quadrupedes, the famous story of the lion's share - and just look at the unusual collection of animals which Barlow has shown as the lion's partners:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available for pre-order at Amazon.com!

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