Friday, January 30, 2009

Round-Up: January 30

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Fabula: De Vulpe et Uva, the famous story of the "sour grapes" (so-called!).

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I really liked about the relative merits of camels and donkeys: Camelus vel scabiosa complurium asinorum gestat onera.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Leges sine moribus vanae (English: Laws without character are worthless - I would say this is a great proverb to apply to the current economic crisis, where only so much can be repaired by legislation; a big change has to come from individual Americans and their approach to getting, spending and saving!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἀγαθοὶ δ' ἀριδάκρυες ἄνδρες (English: Good people are quick to cry - a proverb which shows up in one of the Homeric scholia, and of course the heroes of Homer are definitely not ones to hide their tears!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE LEONE ET QUATTUOR TAURIS (the story of the lion who used the strategy of "divide and conquer" to defeat the bulls). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is Fable 16: Cicada et Formica, the story of the hard-working ant and the happy-go-lucky cicada.

Alciatus - Emblemata: Here is the Alciato emblem for this week: Alciato LVIII: In eos qui supra vires quicquam audent, the story of the little Pygmies who dared to attack the mighty Hercules. You can use the Javascript to include the emblem of the week automatically each day on your webpage or blog (or you can display the 52 emblems at random).




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com!

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