Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Round-Up: January 27

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Fabula: De Lupo et Sue, the story of the wolf who offered to play midwife to the sow in labor.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I really liked, on the occasion of it being Chinese New Year: Nihil annis velocius.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Invidia gloriae comes (English: Envy is a companion to glory - a statement you can find in the Roman author Cornelius Nepos). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἀναρχίας δὲ μεῖζον οὐκ ἔστιν κακόν (English: There is no evil greater than anarchy - and of course we get our English word "anarchy" from this Greek word, ἀν-αρχία, "without-leadership"). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE VULPE IN PUTEO (the story of the fox who was trapped in a well together with a goat). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is Fable 13: Lupi et Oves, the story of the fatal treaty between the wolves and the sheep.

Ning Blog: I've posted something that might be of interest in my Ning Blog: it's the "Roman Counting Game" which explains how to count on your fingers Roman-style while multiplying with numbers 5-9 (along with some information about Roman numerals in general).






Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com!

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