Thursday, January 15, 2009

Round-Up: January 15

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is De Aucupe et Palumbe, a fable which shows a kind of "Aesopic karma" at work, much to the birdcatcher's dismay!

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I really liked: Plus Federicus uno oculo vidit quam ceteri principes duobus (presumably a saying originally associated with "Frederick the One-Eyed," Duke of Swabia in the 12th century, and later included in Polydorus's Proverbiorum Liber, who comments: de hominibus prudentissimis dicitur).

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Dat veniam corvis, vexat censura columbas (English: The censor forgives the crows and harasses the doves - a comment on the injustices of the so-called justice system). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Σὺν Ἀθηνᾷ καὶ χεῖρας κίνει (English: With Athena, move your hands too - an allusion to the wonderful Aesop's fable about Athena and the drowning man). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE VULPE SINE CAUDA (the story of the fox who had lost its tail and wanted to persuade some other foxes to follow suit). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences). Today's Simplified fable is Fable 1: Leaena et Vulpes, which shows the fox and the lioness debating "quantity versus quality."

Alciatus - Emblemata: Here is the Alciato emblem for this week: Alciato VII: Non tibi, sed religioni, the story of the donkey who thought he was an object of worship - kind of a combination of Apuleius's Metamorphoses with the fable of the donkey in the lion's skin! You can use the Javascript to include the emblem of the week automatically each day on your webpage or blog (or you can display the 52 emblems at random).




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available for pre-order at Amazon.com!

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