Thursday, January 1, 2009

Round-Up: January 1

Cunctis lectoribus quam laetissimum Annum Novum exopto: omnia fausta et feliciter eveniant vobis!

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Pavo et Iuno, the story of the proud peacock complaining to Juno about its ugly voice.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Dominus habet oculos centum (English: The master has a hundred eyes - a proverb perfectly illustrated by the fable of the stag who hid in the oxen's stable). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb (including the fable of the stag), visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Νεκρὸς οὐ δάκνει (English: A dead man does not bite... something like the English saying, "Dead men tell no tales."). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE EQUO ET ASELLO ONUSTO (a very wise fable about what happened to the horse who refused to help the donkey carry its load). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 67: Leo et Mus, the story of the mouse who rescued a lion from a snare, much to the lion's surprise.

Alciatus - Emblemata: Now that the December holiday songs have come to a close, I've created a new widget for 2009 based on the marvelous Latin emblems of Alciato. For this New Year's Day, I've chosen Alciato's emblem of Janus, the god of the turning year. You can use the Javascript to include the emblem of the week automatically each day on your webpage or blog (or you can display the 52 emblems at random).



Aesop's Fables in Latin now available for pre-order at Amazon.com!

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