Monday, December 8, 2008

Round-Up: December 8

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

BIG NEWS: Now that the book is off to the printer's (YES, the galleys got proofread on Thursday and off it went to the printer on Friday), I've started in on the multimedia projects to go with the book - Videos at the Aesopus Ning and... the Bestiaria Latina Podcasts are now official! Let me know what you think! I've got a general description of the whole Podcast Plan if you are interested in the details. :-)

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Accipiter et Columbae, the story of the doves who foolishly made the hawk their king.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Omnis est rex in domo sua (English: Each man is king in his own home - much like the English saying, ""a man's home is his castle"). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἐν ψύλλης δήξει Θεὸν ἐπικαλεῖται (English: At the bite of a flea, he calls on the god for help - an allusion to a great Aesop's fable about Hercules!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE RUSTICO ET ARATRO SUO (the wonderful story of how "God helps them that help themselves" - a perfect companion to the Latin proverb of the day today, too!). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 43: Formica et Columba, the story of how the ant repaid the dove for saving her life.

Latin Christmas Carols: Today's Christmas song in Latin is Regis Olim Urbe David ("Once in Royal David's City"). You can use the Javascript to include the Christmas carol of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's song, visit the Gaudium Mundo Christmas Carol website, where you will find the lyrics to the song in Latin, along with links to additional online information about the song:



The Aesopus Ning is now open for business - so for more fables and to share your questions and comments with others, come visit the Ning!


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