Thursday, December 4, 2008

Round-Up: December 4

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

THANK YOU GOOGLE: After months of requesting review of my blog status, week after week, I finally got un-classified as a spam blog! I am officially a human being again! Hurray! :-)

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Unus lanius non timet multas oves (English: One butcher does not fear the many sheep - a proverb with very profound implications indeed!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Σὺ ἐν σεαυτῷ φάρμακα ἔχεις (English: You have the remedy in yourself - a very nice use of Greek "pharmaca"). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE PAVONE ET GRUE (the debate between the peacock and the crane). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 39: Aquila et Testudo, the story of the race between the eagle and the tortoise - a story markedly similar to the story of the tortoise and the hare!

Latin Christmas Carols: Today's Christmas song in Latin is A Solis Ortus Cardine (a Latin hymn based on a poem by the 5th-century Christian poet Sedulius). You can use the Javascript to include the Christmas carol of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's song, visit the Gaudium Mundo Christmas Carol website, where you will find the lyrics to the song in Latin, along with links to additional online information about the song:




The Aesopus Ning is now open for business - so for more fables and to share your questions and comments with others, come visit the Ning!


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