Monday, December 29, 2008

Round-Up: December 29

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Ning Blog: I've posted something that might be of interest in my Ning Blog, "People Latin" (a wonderful cartoon by Dan Reynolds).

Comenius - Lexicon: I've started working my way through a project to digitize Comenius's Latin-Latin dictionary! I've set this up as a wiki so anyone who wants to participate can do so! For more information about participating, see the Comenius Group; for today, I digitized a page containing the entries Abecede - Abdite, including an entry for "alphabet" in Latin - either abecede or alphabetum, etc. How cool!

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Vulgate Verses: Group 4, which contains this immortal saying: Stultorum infinitus est numerus. Indeed!

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Fortuna est rotunda (English: Fortune is round - which is not to say that she is fat, but rather that she is round and turns like a wheel - think "wheel of Fortune"). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Δασύποδα λαγὼν παραδραμεῖται χελώνη (English: The tortoise outruns the hairy-footed rabbit - yes, it's the fable of the tortoise and the hare!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE SENE ET MORTE (the story of the old man who called upon Death - and was surprised when Death answered his summons!). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 64: Satyrus et Viator, the story of the satyr and the man who blew both hot and cold.

Latin Christmas Carols: Today's Christmas song in Latin is Dormi Jesu (published by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in his Sibylline Leaves in 1817.). You can use the Javascript to include the Christmas carol of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's song, visit the Gaudium Mundo Christmas Carol website, where you will find the lyrics to the song in Latin, along with links to additional online information about the song:



Aesop's Fables in Latin now available for pre-order at Amazon.com!

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