Monday, December 1, 2008

Round-Up: December 1

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Asinus in tegulis (English: A donkey on the roof-tiles - a saying that can be either ridiculous... or ominous!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Τῆς ὀξυθυμίας τὸ ἄνθος μανία (English: A bad temper blossoms into madness - a warning to people like me who are prone to being bad-temperted...). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE MURE URBANO ET MURE RUSTICO (the famous story of the city mouse and the country mouse). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 37: Leo et Mus, the wonderful story from Abstemius about the mouse who wanted to married a lion!

Latin Christmas Carols: Today's Christmas song in Latin is Rudolphus rubrinasus (Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer). You can use the Javascript to include the Christmas carol of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's song, visit the Gaudium Mundo Christmas Carol website, where you will find the lyrics to the song in Latin, along with links to additional online information about the song:




The Aesopus Ning is now open for business - so for more fables and to share your questions and comments with others, come visit the Ning!


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