Wednesday, August 13, 2008

Round-Up: August 13

Hi, everybody - I've been very busy lately with back-to-school, as I assume many of you are, too! Anyway, here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.
A note for the Google review person, whoever you are: I filled out one spam blog review request and waited a week; no response, and my request vanished. Then I filled out another spam blog review request a week ago and that one also disappeared with no response. Now I have filled out another one: I guess it can go on this way forever... but at some point, I hope you will be persuaded that I am a human being, too. Assuming, of course, there really IS a Google human being out there reviewing this blog as requested...
Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is O quantum est in rebus inane! (English: Oh how much trivial stuff there is in the world - a great saying to have at hand when watching television, ha ha). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Λύκος ἀετὸν φεύγει (English: The wolf flees the eagle - the idea being that not even a wolf can escape winged pursuit; this one made it into Erasmus's Adagia, 2.7.79 - who admits, "I've never heard of eagles actually pursuing wolves"). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

How-To Technology Tips. Today's technology tip is about Screengrab - a very handy Firefox add-on for taking screenshots.

Latin Via Fables: Today, along with a Latin fable from the Jacobs & Doering Latin Reader, I've added an image slideshow to the blog! It is for Perry 370, the story of the trumpeter captured during the war. I've got about 10 different illustrations in the slideshow; here is one of them (you'll recognize it as another one of Walter Crane's brilliant illustrations):




Some dynamic content may not display if you are reading this blog via RSS or through an email subscription. You can always visit the Bestiaria Latina blog to see the full content, and to find out how to subscribe to the latest posts.



No comments: