Saturday, December 16, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 16

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives.

I've created a YouTube playlist with all the Latin holiday song videos from the Gaudium Mundo blog; there are so many music videos at YouTube, so if you have suggestions about more/better versions of the songs that I can include, let me know!


HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem septimum decimum Kalendas Ianuarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Prometheus Bound, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Irrideo tempestatem (English: I scoff at the storm).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Periculum in mora (English:There is danger in delay)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is In terra caecorum monoculus rex (English: In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Senex bos non lugetur (English: No one grieves for the old ox; from Adagia 2.9.16).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Novitas. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Non ducor: duco.
I am not driven: I drive.

Nil magis amat cupiditas, quam quod non licet.
Greed loves nothing more than what is not allowed.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The English translation for today from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Leo et Homo, Concertantes, a story about fact and fiction.

Leo et Statua

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Vulpes et Corvus, a fable about flattery: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is de aquila et vulpe, a story about a mother's revenge: Latin text and English versions.


GAUDIUM MUNDO: The Latin holiday song for today is Angeli Canunt Praecones, a.k.a. Hark, The Herald Angels Sing.

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 14

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem undevicesimum Kalendas Ianuarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Odysseus and Eurycleia, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Hylam vocat (English: He's shouting for Hylas, which is to say, he's claling out for something that is lost, as Heracles called out for his beloved Hylas, taken by the nymphs).


PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Homo totiens moritur, quotiens amittit suos (English: You die every time you lose someone who is dear to you).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Thasium infundis (English: You're pouring in wine from Thasos; from Adagia 3.2.17... This is an ironic proverb, since instead of using water to dilute the wine, the renowned Thasian wine is being used).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Aut bibe aut abi: A proverbe signifienge that we shoulde applye oursevels to the manners of men, or elles avoyde there companye.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Fama Perennis. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Optimus magister bonus liber.
The best teacher is a good book.

Cavendi nulla est dimittenda occasio.
You should never ignore any chance to act cautiously.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The English translation for today from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Leo Amatorius et Silvanus, the sad story of the lion in love.

Leo Amatorius

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Cervus ad fontem, a story about body image: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is de duobus muribus, the famous fable of the city mouse and the country mouse: Latin text and English versions.


GAUDIUM MUNDO: The Latin holiday song for today is Adeste Fideles, one of the most famous Latin carols: O Come, All Ye Faithful.

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 7

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem septimum Idus Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Heracles and the Mares of Diomedes, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Sapiens non eget (English: The wise man does not lack anything).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Omnes terra sumus (English: We are all earth).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Non est tam fortis, qui rumpat vincula mortis (English: There is no man strong enough to break the bonds of death).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Stultus omnes stultos aestimat (Ecc. 10:3). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Pulchra Vestis. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Sero in periculis est consilium quaerere.
When danger's arrived, it's late to be making a plan.

Libri muti magistri sunt.
Books are silent teachers.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The English translation for today from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Leo et Iaculator, a story in which the lion gets a warning about danger from a distance.

Sagittarius, Leo et Vulpes

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Asinus et leo venantes, a story about a boastful ass and a lion who knows better: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is de homine et serpente, a story about how no good deed goes unpunished: Latin text and English versions.


GAUDIUM MUNDO: The Latin holiday song for today is Angelus ad Virginem.




Sunday, December 3, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 3

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium Nonas Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Venus, Pygmalion and the Statue, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Sagax et audax (English: Keen and bold).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Ubi mel, ibi apes (English: Where there is honey, there are bees).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Lux in tenebris lucet (English: A light shines in the darkness).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἰχθὺς ἐκ τὰς κεφαλῆς ὄζειν ἄρχεται (English: The fish starts to stink from the head... a political metaphor that is very apt these days).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Populo Servire Difficile. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Omnis est rex in domo sua.
Each man is king in his own home.

Nemo timendo ad summum pervenit locum.
No one ever reached the top by being afraid.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The English translation for today from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Leonis Filius et Homo, a great story about a reckless young lion.

Leo et Filius Eius

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Lupus et vulpes iudice simio, a story about two scoundrels who take each other to court: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is de duobus canibus , a story about how no good deed goes unpunished: Latin text and English versions.


GAUDIUM MUNDO: The Latin holiday song for today is O Viri, Este Hilares, a Latin version of "God Rest Ye, Merry Gentlemen."



Friday, December 1, 2017

Special Edition: Gaudium Mundo

I am pleased to announce the eleventh annual Gaudium Mundo, a month of holiday songs in Latin. The calendar of songs begins today, the Kalends of December, with Rudolphus, a Latin version of "Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer," along with the Latin hymns Puer Natus in Bethlehem and Beata Viscera, plus Laetissimam famam, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "Wesołą nowinę."

Each song has its own page at the blog, and where possible I've included YouTube videos with music. For Rudolph, there is even a plain-chant version:



Isn't that marvelous?

If people have suggestions or additions, please let me know. The collection has grown tremendously over the years thanks to the help of so many people: thanks to you all!

And I have something new this year: In addition to the date-based 200-pixel wide script or 400-pixel wide script, there is now a randomized script too, not date-based. You can see that script in action below: 





Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 28

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quartum Kalendas Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Milo of Croton, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Tandem iustitia (English: Justice, at last).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Non sibi solum (English: Not for oneself alone)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Nutrit et accipiter pullos suos (English: Even a hawk nourishes its chicks). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Canes timidi vehementius latrant (English: Dogs that are scared bark more loudly; from Adagia 3.7.100).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Verba Malorum. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Ex vitio alterius sapiens emendat suum.
A wise person corrects their own failings by observing the failings of others.

Somnus donum deorum gratissimum.
Sleep is the most welcome gift of the gods.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The English translation for today from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Leaena et Sus, a story about quality versus quantity.

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Passer ad leporem consiliator, a story about empathy, or the lack thereof: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is Lupus et Grus, which is Steinhowel's version of the fable from Phaedrus in the previous post: Latin text and English versions.



Saturday, November 25, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 25

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Comenius. Last week, I got a note from Chris Huff who is reviving the old Comenius Latin dictionary project; if you are interested, get in touch with him via his blog: Chuff Blog Comenius Project.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem septimum Kalendas Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Heracles and the Lion, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Cicatrix manet (English: The scar remains).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Lex universa est, quae iubet nasci et mori (English: It is a universal law which bids us to be born and to die).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Croesi pecuniae teruncium addit (English: He's adding a penny to the wealth of Croesus... which is to say: he is not making any difference at all, given that Croesus was proverbially wealthy; from Adagia 4.10.48; more about Croesus, and here is a gold coin of Croesus, circa 550 BCE):


ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Sui cuique mores fingunt fortunam: A mans owne maners doe shape him his fortune. Men commonlie when anie adversitie chaunce, accuse, or when they see other men to prospere well in theyr matters, they say it is theyr fortune. So they ley all together upon fortune, thinking there is such a thing called fortune that ruleth all. But surely they are highlie deceived. It is their owne maners, their own qualities, touches, condicions, and procedinges that shape them this fortune, that is to say, that cause them, eyther to be sette forwarde or backeward, either to prospere or not to prospere.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Si Quis Loquatur. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Alit lectio ingenium.
Reading nourishes talent.

Qui dormit, non peccat.
He who sleeps does not sin.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The English translation for today from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Leaena et Ursa, a story about hypocrisy and eating habits.


PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Lupus et grus, a story about how doing favors for scoundrels: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is de duobus canibus, another story about how no good deed goes unpunished: Latin text and English versions.




Thursday, November 23, 2017

Bestiaria Latina: Special Thanksgiving Edition

Happy Thanksgiving to all! The Latin word gratia is very difficult to translate into English: it means thanks and gratitude and love and so much more, including grace ("saying grace" is saying "thank you"). You might take a few minutes just to look at the range of meanings: Lewis and Short.

And here are some Gratia-Cats you can enjoy for the holiday. :-)


Gratia gratiam parit.


GRATIA creates GRATIA.


Gratia referenda.


Return GRATIA for GRATIA.


Non gladio, sed gratia.


Not by means of the sword, but by means of GRATIA.


Beneficium et gratia vincula sunt concordiae.


A good deed and GRATIA are the cords of unity.


Gratia quando datur, studeas ut restituatur.


When GRATIA is given, make sure to do the same in return.


Super argentum et aurum gratia bona.


Above silver and gold, GRATIA is good.


In omnibus gratias agite.


In all things, do GRATIAS.