Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Round-Up: December 14

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm using Google+ a lot these days - are there any of you I should look for there?

HODIE: ante diem undevicesimum Kalendas Ianuarias.

GAUDIUM MUNDO: Here are some Latin holiday songs for you to enjoy - O Sanctissima (a song famously sung by Bing Crosby in The Bells of Saint Mary's), A Solis Ortus Cardine (a song with words by the 5th-century Christian poet Sedulius), and Jesus Minimulus (a Latin version of the Polish carol, Jezus MalusieĊ„ki).

Myths & Legends: The art image for today's legend shows Scylla; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.

OWEN'S EPIGRAMS: The two new Owen epigrams, with Harvey's English versions, are Virtutis Laus, Solis ut, in solo motu, constantia constat, / Constans virtutis vis in agendo sita.; and Lyra, In tam diversis cum sit concordia chordis, / Tam discors hominum non pudet esse genus?. (They each come a vocabulary list!)

CAMERARIUS'S EMBLEMS: The two new emblems are Perseverando, Quid non perficiat labor improbus? Aspicis, arbor / Ut cadat a morsu castoris assiduo.; and Diarii Omnes, Extremum statuas ut quemlibet esse dierum, / Fida tibi monitrix hemerocallis erit.. (These have vocabulary too!)

VERBUM WIDGET: The word from the daily widget is AQUA - which also has a brief essay at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in that essay: Tempora labuntur more fluentis aquae, "The times slip by in the manner of flowing water."

GOOGLE BOOKS: Today's Google Books are Flowers of Fable and The New Dictionary of Quotations from the Greek, Latin, and Modern Languages .

TODAY'S FABLES & STORIES:

ANECDOTE OF THE DAY: Today's anecdote is Hannibal in Italiam, the famous story of Hannibal crossing the Alps.

FABULAE FACILES: The NEW easy-to-read fable is Canis et Vultur, the story of a greedy dog and the punishment of his greed (and the fable comes with a vocabulary list).

FABULAE FACILES WIDGET: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Cancer et Filius Eius, a story about parental hypocrisy among the crabs (this one also has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The "chunk" of Mille Fabulae et Una today is Fable 161 through Fable 170, including Lepus Cornua Cupiens, the sad story who wanted to have horns as big as those of the stag.

NEW MILLE FABULAE: The NEW fables with images are Fur et Paterfamilias, a story about a man who snoozes instead of protecting his home, and Pueruli Duo Fratres, a story about two little boys and how hard it is to share cookies!

MILLE FABULAE WIDGET: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Leo et Equus, a story of how the horse escaped from the lion's clutches.

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Cat and The Fox, a story in which the fox is too clever for its own good!

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS:

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Vivamus atque amemus (English: Let us live and love).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Par pari referto (English: Pay back like for like).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Laudatur nummus, quasi rex super omnia summus (English: Cash is praised as if it were the greatest king of all things).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Discite benefacere; quaerite iudicium (Isaiah 1:17). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Aquilae senectus: A proverbe spoken of an olde man, which drincketh more than he eateth.

Today's image is for that story of the crabs: 586. Cancer et Filius Eius. Cancer dicebat filio, “Mi fili, ne sic obliquis semper gressibus incede, sed recta via perge.” Cui ille “Mi pater,” respondit, “libenter tuis praeceptis obsequar, si te prius idem facientem videro.” (source - easy version)

Cancri Duo

2 comments:

CA3 said...

I was curious. Do you know of any songs sung in Latin that one could just download?

Laura Gibbs said...

There is lots to listen to at YouTube, but I'm not sure what you can find to download for free.